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[Video description can be found below. If you use a screen reader and need to access the caption file transcript, go to “More…” and click on “Transcript”]

Did you know that using interpreters in hospitals is a result of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)? NAD intern Nia Lazarus takes a moment to explain. View the entire #ADA25 series at www.nad.org/ADA25.

Video begins with an off white vintage background. Three black and white photos appear. First photo shows a group of people marching, one holds a NAD poster. Second photo shows another group of people marching, one holds a poster “We Shall Overcome.” Third photo shows President Bush signing the Americans with Disabilities Act. Text appears “ADA25 — Americans with Disabilities Act”. Video flashes to white then to Nia Lazarus inside NAD Headquarters. On bottom left corner, “#ADA25” appears as a light watermark. On bottom right corner, the NAD logo appears, also as a light watermark.

NIA: Going to a hospital can be a nerve-wrecking experience. You are in pain, or scared, or both. A treating doctor cannot properly assess your medical needs simply by looking at you. Often the medical team needs information – and this requires communication. The ADA requires hospitals to provide auxiliary aids and services when necessary to ensure effective communication for deaf and hard of hearing patients and companions. This includes auxiliary aids and service include qualified interpreters, CART, captioning and so forth. The NAD has sued several hospitals for refusing to provide services. Our first case was filed in 1997. The Department of Justice was involved. As a result of this case, the hospital created a model policy including qualified interpreters, TTYs, captioned TVs, CART, telephone flashers, training for hospital staff, signs outlining deaf and hard of hearing rights. That wasn’t our last case. We have several hospitals cases under our belt, including a nice settlement in 2006 in Heiesley v. INOVA which provided a clear guideline and model policy that we use in our other cases. We continue to have lawsuits against hospitals today. A big contemporary issue is the use of Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) in hospitals. [VRI is addressed in a different ADA25 video].

Video fades to a gradient background with dark blue to light blue, a grey National Association of the Deaf (NAD) logo is centered. White text below the logo appears, “A production of the National Association of the Deaf (copyright) 2015 All Rights Reserved” with four teal social media icons, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram.

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silentgrapevine

SG Mission: to serve our viewers by providing reliable, valuable, and important Deaf community oriented information in every newcast.