Each and every one of us always ask ourselves, “Do we tell the employer we’re deaf?” What do the experts think? #JobSearch #DeafAtWork #DeafEmployment #EmploymentTip #TipTuesday

EXPLORE: www.nad.org/nerc

VIDEO DESC & TRANSCRIPT: The NAD logo appears on bottom right corner as a watermark. On-screen graphic with comic style with black and white video footage in background shows title: “DO I TELL THEM?”

On-screen-text ID: DARIAN / NC DHHS REGIONAL DIRECTOR

DARIAN: Oftentimes people wonder if they should tell them they’re deaf when applying for a job. Honestly, it depends on the situation. I think if your resume is stellar then you don’t need to let them know until they contact you for an interview.

On-screen graphic with comic style with a “wow” factor spins into frame as the background video freezes in black and white: WAIT UNTIL INTERVIEW CONFIRMED.

DARIAN: Maybe from there you can let them know you’ll need an interpreter for the interview. So, I don’t know if you want to give them too much information – it’s your call.

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On-screen-text ID: JOHN / NTID CAREER CENTER DIRECTOR

JOHN: It depends on whether you want to become the “first” deaf employee to work at that company or join a company that has a history of hiring deaf people.

On-screen graphic with comic style with a “wow” factor spins into frame as the background video freezes in black and white: UP TO YOU.

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On-screen-text ID: ISIDORE / HR MANAGER

ISIDORE: I will recommend that you mention it, yes, because they should know from the beginning. If you’re concerned about them ignoring your application because you mentioned you’re deaf, that’s totally valid too. That might happen because they may balk at interpreting costs, I get your concerns.

On-screen graphic with comic style with a “wow” factor spins into frame as the background video freezes in black and white: YES, TELL THEM.

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On-screen-text ID: AMY / RMDS DIRECTOR

AMY: What’s your rapport like? How do you feel when you apply with them? Are they communicating with you? Do you think they’re open to providing accommodations or should you bring in your own interpreter? Or maybe you prefer using technology means for the interview. Honestly, you have to evaluate all the factors to determine whether or not you tell them.

On-screen graphic with comic style with a “wow” factor spins into frame as the background video freezes in black and white: EVALUATE.

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JOHN: Some deaf students are not comfortable putting the word “deaf” anywhere on their resume because they believe they won’t get a chance to be interviewed. If you’re applying for a big company or a federal agency, it may be a good idea to put “deaf” somewhere because those big companies are committed to hiring people with disabilities. However, if it is a small company, you may want to think twice.

On-screen graphic with comic style with a “wow” factor spins into frame as the background video freezes in black and white: ARE THEY COMMITTED TO DIVERSITY?

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On-screen-text ID: TODD / OUTREACH DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

TODD: Share resources that can help educate them on deaf and hard of hearing people’s employment rights — like the ADA and the NAD or your local VR representative, they’d know rules and regulations for companies to comply. However, even though companies follow the rules, they may not be friendly about it. If that’s the case, it might not be a good idea to apply there if they don’t cooperate. I suggest you find another place that is warm and welcoming for not only deaf and hard of hearing people but also DeafBlind, people of different races, and so on.

On-screen graphic with comic style with a “wow” factor spins into frame as the background video freezes in black and white: ARE THEY WELCOMING?

TODD: If they seem open minded then go ahead and try because you’ll have a better success rate with their accommodations.

Video cuts to grey background with the NAD logo quickly changing in different bright colors from teal to white to black to hot pink to green to orange to teal to yellow to purple to finally the official NAD logo with copyright text underneath “The National Association of the Deaf (c) 2019 All Rights Reserved”.

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