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Did you know that Alzheimer’s disease comes in several stages, ranging from mild to severe? People with Alzheimer’s Disease sometimes have different types of behavior.
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#HealthFactFriday #DeafHealth

[VIDEO DESC & TRANSCRIPT: Dwight is standing in front of a dark background. Clip begins with a freeze frame in black and while. A yellow box in the top right corner appears with black text “HEALTH FACT”. White text appears in near left center, “stages of ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE” as a white line underlines it.

DWIGHT: Stages of Alzheimer’s – what do the three symptoms look like? There are three stages of Alzheimer’s disease — mild, moderate, and severe. People are often diagnosed during the mild stage and are detected easily earlier. In the mild stage, the person would look healthy, but they may have some trouble connecting to reality. The symptoms often shown some memory loss, poor judgments, loss in self-conscience, and some changes in personality. Although, at this stage, people with Alzheimer’s disease are still capable of living on their own and can do daily tasks. The moderate stage can be difficult for the loved ones of people with Alzheimer’s disease because there will be more intensive supervision and care needed. The symptoms often show that there will be an increase in memory loss; the person with Alzheimer’s disease would be unable to learn new things. They may have a harder time recognizing their family members. Due to frustration and confusion, inappropriate outbursts will occur frequently. Once the person with Alzheimer’s disease reaches the stage of severity, they will become dependent on others’ care and cannot communicate properly. The symptoms are more related to the person with Alzheimer’s disease’s health. The health issues could be weight loss, seizures, skin infections, or loss of bladder control. At this stage, there will be a need for around-the-clock professional who assists the person with Alzheimer’s disease.

Clip fades out to a white background with black text in center, “This project was made possible with funding from the National Institutes of Health/NDICD (#5R01DC01446395 and supplements awarded to Poorna Kushalnagar, Ph.D.).” Next clip, white background with three logos — Deaf Seniors of America’s logo and the NAD’s logo are in a row, centered, underneath both logos is the Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center’s logo.]

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silentgrapevine

SG Mission: to serve our viewers by providing reliable, valuable, and important Deaf community oriented information in every newcast.