Read Time:2 Minute, 59 Second

Civic Access team shares tips on how to request an interpreter! #ProtectYourAccess #DeafYouth #NADYouthSummerSeries

– – –

VIDEO DESC/ TRANSCRIPT: Alyssa has a dark blonde hair in a ponytail- she is wearing light blue-rim glasses, a loose middle sleeve navy shirt, and dark colored circle earrings. Alyssa is standing in front of a white background.

ALYSSA: Hello, I am Alissa Conover from Civic Access as a community advocate in Virginia.

Anna is wearing a black short sleeve shirt. The background is forest green.
ANNA: Hello, I am A7A (sign name), Anna Lynch. I’m Deaf Interpreter, collaborated and work with ‘CA’ Civic Access. We have important tips to share with you.

ALYSSA: One of our tips: effective communication. What does it means to us: the deaf community? Not just deaf, but DeafBlind, deaf with disability, hearing loss, and more to list. This includes the varied communication methods such as American Sign Language, cued speech, Signed English Language and more to list you can name. Make sure you make a request, “I prefer effective communication- [American Sign Language or your preferred communication methods] for my appointment.” The requestor will accept the request. The requestor could be from a hospital, K-12 school, college, Department Motor Vehicle (DMV) or any settings. You have your rights. Did you know that? Where can we find the “effective communication” definition from? We have a book that explains “effective communication” written by the National Association of the Deaf (NAD). [Showing the brown book of “Legal Rights” and pointing to the “Effective Communication” from the neon yellow tab with a page]. Not only from this book, but you could find these words from ADA.gov. [Woman’s right hand pointing on right side]

[Showing the searching the website, American with Disability Act- “ADA.gov” and type in the search bar, “Effective Communication” as showing the list then clicked the “requirement: effective communication”. Appearing in the Overview summary.]

ANNA: Effective communication. Ah, when you need an interpreter, you will need to request an interpreter. You want them to work and be transparent together? You can! When you have an opportunity and time, use of all of these three tips: First, when you request an interpreter, share your communication needs with them. Ask them “who is my interpreter?” Does that interpreter meet your needs? Secondly, it doesn’t matter if your appointment is quick or long. A lot of information and depth. Make time to share your interpreter with your word sign preference. You want the information to be explained in depth or information to be abbreviated. Let them know. Third, I suggest you have a closure discussion on your interpreter’s work. “You have met my needs, but those have not” Interpreters will be able to know if they have met your needs or not, so they can improve next time.

ALYSSA: Beautiful, A7A! I wanted to add a tip related to interpreters and interpreting agency preferences. Please make sure you do your homework when choosing an interpreting agencies/preferred interpreters if you haven’t. Reach on the internet. Ask your family members, your close friends or mentors for their advice to make sure you select the right interpreter agency for you. We recommend to have a list of a minimum of three interpreting agencies to share with the requestor. You are also encouraged to select three preferred interpreters from each agency. If you already have an interpreting agency you prefer, be sure to share at least three names that fits your communication access.

Video fades to Civic Access logo then fades to a black screen.

0 0
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleppy
Sleppy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)

Comments

comments

author

silentgrapevine

SG Mission: to serve our viewers by providing reliable, valuable, and important Deaf community oriented information in every newcast.