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[Title slide with Wilder’s logo and MNCDHH’s logo. Title is “Supporting DeafBlind Children and Youth in Minnesota: A Strategic Plan for Moving Forward” ASL talent Jessica Eggert is signing throughout the video in a PIP in the top, right corner.]

Hello! This video presents the key findings and recommendations from our recent project with the Minnesota Commission for the Deaf, DeafBlind & Hard of Hearing. We partnered with the Commission to create a data-informed strategic plan to better support DeafBlind children and youth in Minnesota.

[Next slide appears, “DeafBlind children and youth in Minnesota. * 379 children and youth in Minnesota * Each are unique individuals with different needs and strengths”]

A 2019 census by the National Center on Deaf-Blindness identified 379 DeafBlind children and youth in our state. These children and youth are all unique individuals with different needs and strengths. Some have serious health conditions or developmental delays in addition to being DeafBlind. These children and their families may need significant medical, educational, and social support, whereas other DeafBlind children and their families can achieve their goals with less support.

[Next slide appears, “45 interviews. 23 interviews with parents of DeafBlind children and youth, 17 interviews with professionals who serve DeafBlind children and youth, 5 interviews with DeafBlind young adults.” A pie graph with the 23-17-5 data is also onscreen.]

We identified the six action items that appear in the strategic plan by interviewing 45 DeafBlind young adults, parents of DeafBlind children, and professionals who serve DeafBlind children and their families.

[Next slide appears, “Key findings 1. Minnesota lacks a cohesive system for supporting DeafBlind children and youth 2. Parents feel over-extended, want more support, and often act as their child’s services coordinator.”]

The key findings from these interviews include: • Minnesota lacks a cohesive system for supporting DeafBlind children and youth • As a result, parents feel over-extended, want more support, and often act as their child’s services coordinator.

[Next slide appears, ” Key findings 3. Professionals recommended a number of system and practice improvements – Improved coordination and communication among service providers – More and better training for professionals who serve DeafBlind children and youth – More professional support and guidance for DeafBlind children and youth and their loved ones”]

Professionals recommended a number of system and practice improvements, including: – Improved coordination and communication among service providers – More and better training for professionals who serve DeafBlind children and youth – More professional support and guidance for DeafBlind children and youth and their loved ones.

[Next slide appears, “This mimics everything I experienced as a young person growing up DeafBlind.” – Advisory group member.]

We shared these key findings with our advisory group, which included 22 DeafBlind adults, parents of DeafBlind children, and professionals who serve DeafBlind children and their families. After seeing the findings, one advisory group member said, “This mimics everything I experienced as a young person growing up DeafBlind.”

[Next slide appears, “Action items. 1. Promote coordinated services and the sharing of information among service providers 2. Help DeafBlind children and their families coordinate their services 3. Provide education about deafblindness to parents and providers”]

Based on the key findings, our advisory group identified six action items to better support DeafBlind children and youth in Minnesota: • Promote coordinated services and the sharing of information among service providers • Help DeafBlind children and their families coordinate their services • Provide education about deafblindness to parents and providers.

[Next slide appears, “Action items. 4. Offer social connection and emotional support to DeafBlind children and their families 5. Prepare DeafBlind youth for the transition to community-based services at age 21 6. Contribute to legislative and policy-focused activities that could improve the lives of DeafBlind children”]

• Offer social connection and emotional support to DeafBlind children and their families • Prepare DeafBlind youth for the transition to community-based services at age 21 • Contribute to legislative and policy-focused activities that could improve the lives of DeafBlind children.

[Next slide appears, “Next steps. * The Commission will set a framework for accomplishing the six action items. * They will set this framework with the guidance of the DeafBlind workgroup * The DeafBlind workgroup served as the advisory group for this project”]

The next steps for this project include the Commission setting a framework for accomplishing the six action items. The Commission will do this with the guidance of the DeafBlind workgroup…

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SG Mission: to serve our viewers by providing reliable, valuable, and important Deaf community oriented information in every newcast.