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There are many ways for voters with a range of disabilities to vote privately and independently.

State and federal laws require polling places to be physically accessible. Cities and towns typically choose polling place locations and are responsible for polling place accessibility.

You can bring anyone to assist you while you vote or you can get assistance from election judges. You cannot get assistance from your employer or your union. Your assistant can participate in all parts of the voting process. Assistants cannot influence how you vote or mark the ballot for you if you cannot communicate to them who you want to vote for.

You have the right to orally confirm who you are and to ask another person to sign for you if you cannot sign your name.

You can vote while under guardianship unless a judge specifically has taken away your right to vote in a court order.

Most polling places have an accessible voting machine that can mark a ballot for you. It gives you privacy if you cannot (or choose not) to vote using a pen. The machine has a screen that displays the ballot in large print or with a high-contrast background. It can also read the ballot to you through headphones. You can fill out your ballot using a Braille keypad, touchscreen, or sip-and-puff device. After you make your choices, the machine prints your completed ballot.

Curbside voting is available as well. If you cannot easily leave your vehicle, you can ask to have a ballot brought out to you. This is known as ‘curbside voting’. Two election judges from different major political parties will bring out a ballot to you. When you are finished voting, election judges will bring your ballot inside and put it in the ballot box.

If you make a mistake on the ballot before you cast it, you have the right to get a new replacement ballot.

If you are unhappy with the way an election is being run, or encounter issues at the polling place, you have the right to file a written complaint at your polling place.

If you have any questions or concerns, you can contact the Office of the Minnesota Secretary of State by visiting mnvotes.org or calling 1-877-600-VOTE.

Credits:
The Office of the Minnesota Secretary of State and the Minnesota Commission of the Deaf, DeafBlind & Hard of Hearing thank:

Regina Daniels for ASL talent.
Patty McCutcheon for voiceover.
Keystone Interpreting Solutions for film production.

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